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Redecentralize

We’ve had enough of digital monopolies and surveillance capitalism. We want an alternative world that works for everyone, just like the original intention of the web and net.

We seek a world of open platforms and protocols with real choices of applications and services for people. We care about privacy, transparency and autonomy. Our tools and organisations should fundamentally be accountable and resilient.

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Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-12 08:30:41
incompleteness theorem. To intervene on behalf of a decentralized network requires that the conversation be taken somewhere *outside* that network. We see this with Bitcoin's response to GHASH.IO temporarily getting 51%. The response was rapid, and was coordinated via sites like Reddit /r/bitcoin and other things completely separate from /...\ where you've got multiple types of systems -- including both centralized and decentralized -- that back each other to create an "antifragile" network. > The Bitcoin network solves the trust problem by essentially trusting itself. If someone successfully mounted a 51% attack against Bitcoin, nothing would be broken /...\ concerned, when 51% of the network extends the block chain that's the right thing... right? Another way of putting this is that the Bitcoin users solve the trust problem by trusting the majority, where resistance to a Sybil attack comes from allocating votes proportional to computing power. Which works
maze@strahlungsfrei.de [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] What *else* are people doing with blockchains? 2014-01-02 16:07:02
about hearing about all that cool stuff ;-)) a few days ago I found http://twister.net.co/, a p2p microblogging platform. It uses a modified Bitcoin mining algorithm for registering nicknames in the network. Quoting the FAQ: "Bitcoin, in the sense of the digital currency, is not used /...\ However, the Bitcoin protocol and the implementation of the neat idea of block chain is on the basis of twister. The block chain provides a sort of distributed notary service, certifying who owns a given nickname. The name is associated with a specific key pair, which is used for authentication /...\ cryptography." What made me laugh and shudder at the same time was this: "The same mechanism used in Bitcoin for mining is also used in twister but for a different purpose, ensuring the order in which user registrations took place (the nickname belongs to whoever registered it first
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-19 12:22:38
On Aug 14, 2014, at 1:30 AM, David Geib < trustiosity.zrm@gmail.com > wrote: It
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-13 21:04:47
before any attack is launched against the network, you can then designate them as trusted parties without any external contact. This is like the Bitcoin solution except that instead of using processing power as the limit on Sybils you use human face time. Then when the attack comes you already /...\ easy. Just make two cakes. Make a centralized cake and a decentralized cake. > I tend to think that Bitcoin is going to crash and burn. It has all the makings of a bubble. It's inherently deflationary which promotes hoarding and speculation which causes the price to increase /...\ technical architecture. So if somebody breaks the technology *or* somebody comes up with something better or even a worthwhile but incompatible improvement to Bitcoin itself, when everyone stops using Bitcoin in favor of the replacement the Bitcoins all lose their value. For example if anyone ever breaks SHA256 it would
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-12 20:23:47
before any attack is launched against the network, you can then designate them as trusted parties without any external contact. This is like the Bitcoin solution except that instead of using processing power as the limit on Sybils you use human face time. Then when the attack comes you already /...\ relay or lookup database), everything requiring that function can carry on working. > Yep. It's one of the reasons I don't think Bitcoin in its present form is necessarily *that* much more robust than central banks and other financial entities. I tend to think that Bitcoin is going /...\ technical architecture. So if somebody breaks the technology *or* somebody comes up with something better or even a worthwhile but incompatible improvement to Bitcoin itself, when everyone stops using Bitcoin in favor of the replacement the Bitcoins all lose their value. For example if anyone ever breaks SHA256 it would
Jonathan Deamer [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] What *else* are people doing with blockchains? 2014-01-02 16:21:10
proof of existence, voting.) Personally, I thought proof of existence seemed the most elegant and obvious-in-hindsight. I really like the idea of Bitcoin as a Mediawiki anti-spam plugin, mainly because of the possibilities it hints at for micropayments (and online content business models!) with scriptable money. (Hope /...\ didn't sound too Nathan Barley.) Sent from my mobile On 2 Jan 2014, at 15:41, Eric Mill < eric@konklone.com > wrote: Besides Bitcoin, or potentially on top of Bitcoin, how are people using blockchains for things other than currency? I'd like to write about the subject /...\ Namecoin into practical application in a user-friendly way. I've also been sent this project by Agora Voting to do a Bitcoin-based secure voting system, but they're not releasing their draft til they raise way too many BTC. And I've seen Proof of Existence , a simple
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] What *else* are people doing with blockchains? 2014-01-03 10:36:17
proof of existence, voting.) Personally, I thought proof of existence seemed the most elegant and obvious-in-hindsight. I really like the idea of Bitcoin as a Mediawiki anti-spam plugin, mainly because of the possib ilities it hints at for micropayments (and online content business models!) with scriptable money /...\ didn't sound too Nathan Barley.) Sent from my mobile On 2 Jan 2014, at 15:41, Eric Mill < eric@konklone.com > wrote: Besides Bitcoin, or potentially on top of Bitcoin, how are people using blockchains for things other than currency? I'd like to write about the subject /...\ Namecoin into practical application in a user-friendly way. I've also been sent this project by Agora Voting to do a Bitcoin-base d secure voting system, but they're not releasing their draft til they raise way too many BTC. And I've seen Proof of Existence
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] What *else* are people doing with blockchains? 2014-01-02 12:02:15
proof of existence, voting.) Personally, I thought proof of existence seemed the most elegant and obvious-in-hindsight. I really like the idea of Bitcoin as a Mediawiki anti-spam plugin, mainly because of the possib ilities it hints at for micropayments (and online content business models!) with scriptable money /...\ didn't sound too Nathan Barley.) Sent from my mobile On 2 Jan 2014, at 15:41, Eric Mill < eric@konklone.com > wrote: Besides Bitcoin, or potentially on top of Bitcoin, how are people using blockchains for things other than currency? I'd like to write about the subject /...\ Namecoin into practical application in a user-friendly way. I've also been sent this project by Agora Voting to do a Bitcoin-base d secure voting system, but they're not releasing their draft til they raise way too many BTC. And I've seen Proof of Existence
Eric Mill [LibreList] What *else* are people doing with blockchains? 2014-01-02 10:41:43
Besides Bitcoin, or potentially on top of Bitcoin, how are people using blockchains for things other than currency? I'd like to write about the subject, and round up what I can. So for example, I'm aware of Namecoin , and the OkTurtles project, which is trying /...\ Namecoin into practical application in a user-friendly way. I've also been sent this project by Agora Voting to do a Bitcoin-based secure voting system, but they're not releasing their draft til they raise way too many BTC. And I've seen Proof of Existence , a simple /...\ clever way to use the Bitcoin blockchain to prove you had something at a given time, without revealing what the something is. What else is out there? -- Eric -- konklone.com | @konklone
Filipe Farinha [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-18 10:22:06
official' webcasts, will it be possible for > participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly > send > Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will > encourage > others from the Bitcoin community to do so. > > Best Regards
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Net Neutrality Ruling, Internet Interprets Censorship as Damage, There are no Captains, Decentralize Everything, etc. 2014-01-14 14:38:21
ordinary human is asked what do they thing of as an example of P2P or F2F tech).  Given the news about Bitcoin it's a sure bet at least some people if asked on the street might also say 'Bitcoin' (or alternately, "what's P2P?" or "Software
maze@strahlungsfrei.de [LibreList] Secure Bitcoin wallet backups 2014-01-05 19:48:11
Just watched the interesting interview with Daniel Silverstone [1]. There was the idea of having secure Bitcoin wallet backups by doing N-of-M secret-sharing. I would like to add that the Bitcoin Armory client already seems to be able to something similar. See "Using Fragmented Backups
Odinn Cyberguerrilla [LibreList] Net Neutrality Ruling, Internet Interprets Censorship as Damage, There are no Captains, Decentralize Everything, etc. 2014-01-14 12:14:11
mind if an ordinary human is asked what do they thing of as an example of P2P or F2F tech). Given the news about Bitcoin it's a sure bet at least some people if asked on the street might also say 'Bitcoin' (or alternately, "what
Filipe Farinha [LibreList] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-16 21:45:43
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-03 11:31:11
capable of evolving" as a warning: how far does the implementation deviate? Thanks /Jörg PS: As you are sharing my reservations wrt. Bitcoin while at the same time looking for trust and accountability you might want to look at how those alternatives compare.  The 51% of hash /...\ fraction of a second over WAN, b) privacy: data lives precisely where you expect it to be and is not leaked elsewhere.  Downsides: Bitcoin is open-join.  Anybody can participate.  With Askemos you get close-join.  Like WhatsApp: the owner needs to accept the other party
Stephan Tual [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-24 22:15:06
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 23:05:21
proof of work scheme. I get the feeling that cryptocurrencies are used as some sort of decentralization hammer. Don't get me wrong, bitcoin is a brilliant design, but the assurances it gives you (total ordering & consistency) are just not necessary for many applications. Secure-scuttlebutt is somewhere inbetween /...\ messages from Bob without possibly altering them. So there are three > distinct challenges: authentication, message-verification, and dataset > coordination. > > Bitcoin, for example, solves all three of these problems. Broadly... > >  - Authentication: RSA keypairs. > ( https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address#Proving_you_receive_with_an_address ). >  - Message-verification: transaction
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 16:55:31
proof of work scheme. I get the feeling that cryptocurrencies are used as some sort of decentralization hammer. Don't get me wrong, bitcoin is a brilliant design, but the assurances it gives you (total ordering & consistency) are just not necessary for many applications. Secure-scuttlebutt is somewhere inbetween /...\ messages from Bob without possibly altering them. So there are three > distinct challenges: authentication, message-verification, and dataset > coordination. > > Bitcoin, for example, solves all three of these problems. Broadly... > > - Authentication: RSA keypairs. > (https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address#Proving_you_receive_with_an_address). > - Message-verification: transaction signatures. > - Dataset coordination
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-03 11:04:25
feeling that >> cryptocurrencies >> are used as some sort of decentralization hammer. Don't get me wrong, >> bitcoin is a brilliant design, but the assurances it gives you (total >> ordering & consistency) >> are just not necessary for many applications /...\ there are three >> > distinct challenges: authentication, message-verification, and dataset >> > coordination. >> > >> > Bitcoin, for example, solves all three of these problems. Broadly... >> > >> > - Authentication: RSA keypairs. >> > >> > (https://en.bitcoin.it
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-04 15:07:09
least that the way BALL implements the concept.) > So there are three distinct challenges: authentication, > message-verification, and dataset coordination. > > Bitcoin, for example, solves all three of these problems. Broadly... > > - Authentication: RSA keypairs. > (https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address#Proving_you_receive_with_an_address). > - Message-verification: transaction signatures. > - Dataset /...\ coordination: the global blockchain and total ordering via PoW. Bitcoin – it's a bit tiring. Sure it does solve these things in some way. It has to. The only thing we do slightly different is the data set coordination. PoW is just not good enough. It leaks information
Anish Mangal [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-16 21:42:50
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
Joakim Stai [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-16 18:21:41
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
will.sch [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-16 15:17:45
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
Joakim Stai [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-17 11:19:48
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Webcasts / Periscope 2015-10-17 11:55:30
there aren't any 'official' webcasts, will it be possible for participants to Periscope the sessions? If yes, then I'll gladly send Bitcoin tips to any volunteers who take up the task, and will encourage others from the Bitcoin community to do so. Best Regards Filipe Farinha
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-14 04:30:54
website, etc. A little bit social network + web of trust + key:value store. > I think the tech behind it is more interesting than Bitcoin itself. It reminds me of the web. Hypertext, browsers, and the new hybrid thin client model they led to was interesting. The internet was certainly
ben [GG] Re: Public Money until tomorrow evening: 2016-04-10 14:54:00
building the "next Google", but when you look at the underground digital scene, what is striking is the vitality of decentralized technologies. The bitcoin being the most visible today.  So there is a lot of relevance for Europe to massively invest in the decentralization of the internet. Here
juh [GG] Re: Redecentralize Radar, our super picky usable app directory 2017-02-28 23:20:00
contrary to the individualised ethos of most western developers (I don't want to say libertarianism) it is not happening. Instead things like bitcoin come up which fuel the next decade of predator capitalism. Instead I would propose, for example, to found an organisation under public law to distribute literature
Stephan Tual [LibreList] London panelist? 2014-04-25 14:50:43
developer to write and distribute next-generation decentralized applications. Borrowing the concept of distributed consensus and cryptographic proof that makes cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin so effective in trustless payments, Ethereum extends the use of these technologies to trustless agreements. This allows developers to easily build innovative new products
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Trustworthy Contract Handling - Comparison Of Approaches 2014-07-29 09:57:54
gathering infos for a comparison of approaches towards trustworthy, tamper-proofed autonomous systems. So far I have in alphabetic order: Askemos/Wallet, Bitcoin, Ethereum, OpenTransactions, Ricardian Contracts. What about: Drogulus, does it do contracts? Which did I miss? Should I compare other properties too? Note that info might be wrong
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-04 12:45:35
Bitcoin – it's a bit tiring. Sure it does solve these things in some way.  It has to. It's just a well-known example. Got one question here: this seems to replicate data.  Does it protect against malicious updates too? It creates
Jeremie Miller [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] London panelist? 2014-04-25 08:01:11
developer to write and distribute next-generation decentralized applications. Borrowing the concept of distributed consensus and cryptographic proof that makes cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin so effective in trustless payments, Ethereum extends the use of these technologies to trustless agreements. This allows developers to easily build innovative new products
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] FireChat in Economist 2014-06-03 08:29:42
server, but check with the net whether the result is acceptable according the the underlying "smart contract". The check could be done via Bitcoin-alike block chains or using byzantine agreement.  Maybe other options I'm not aware of.) So far I only know of askemos.org doing
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] FireChat in Economist 2014-06-03 10:35:02
server, but check with the net whether the result is acceptable according the the underlying "smart contract". The check could be done via Bitcoin-alike block chains or using byzantine agreement.  Maybe other options I'm not aware of.) So far I only know of askemos.org doing
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] FireChat in Economist 2014-06-03 10:17:33
server, but check with the net whether the result is acceptable according the the underlying "smart contract". The check could be done via Bitcoin-alike block chains or using byzantine agreement.  Maybe other options I'm not aware of.) So far I only know of askemos.org doing
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] FireChat in Economist 2014-06-04 10:32:38
server, but check with the net whether the result is acceptable according the the underlying "smart contract". The check could be done via Bitcoin-alike block chains or using byzantine agreement.  Maybe other options I'm not aware of.) So far I only know of askemos.org doing
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 18:25:57
that Alice can rehost messages from Bob without possibly altering them. So there are three distinct challenges: authentication, message-verification, and dataset coordination. Bitcoin, for example, solves all three of these problems. Broadly...  - Authentication: RSA keypairs. ( https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address#Proving_you_receive_with_an_address ).  - Message-verification: transaction signatures.  - Dataset
Bastien Guerry [LibreList] FLOSS4P2P: Call for Participation 2015-02-18 10:28:26
rapidly growing: not just for software and encyclopedias, but also for information (OpenStreetMap, Wikihow), hardware (FabLabs, Open Source Ecology), accommodation (Couchsurfing) and currency (Bitcoin, Altcoins). In the last few years, it has become clear to many that it is not enough to develop free/libre/open source (FLOSS) alternatives, but we also
haltingstate@gmail.com [LibreList] (no subject) 2013-12-08 19:39:44
Hello! I did the golang secp256k1 wrapper for elliptic curve cryptography (secp251ks is curve used by Bitcoin) and am working on a few transport layer security projects. https://github.com/haltingstate
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: Trustworthy Contract Handling - Comparison Of Approaches 2014-08-03 14:56:05
gathering infos for a comparison of approaches towards > trustworthy, tamper-proofed autonomous systems. > > So far I have in alphabetic order: Askemos/Wallet, Bitcoin, Ethereum, > OpenTransactions, Ricardian Contracts. > > What about: Drogulus, does it do contracts? Which did I miss? Nicholas: does Drogulus have an idea about