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Redecentralize

We’ve had enough of digital monopolies and surveillance capitalism. We want an alternative world that works for everyone, just like the original intention of the web and net.

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Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-12 08:30:41
wrote: > I was thinking: does this almost reduce to the "hard AI problem?" Detecting which nodes are malicious might not even be computable. It's the lack of verifiable information. Unless you have some trust anchors to create a frame of reference you can never tell who is defecting /...\ relevant, is probably not the central bugaboo. The central problem is trust. What and who do you trust, and why, and how do you compute this? The solution most of the Internet uses is for real-world political entities (corporations, governments, etc.) to create signing certificates. This is also /...\ topology root dictionary. Trust without some centralized "god" somewhere is extraordinarily hard for the reasons you discuss. How do I trust? How do I compute trust? How do I cooperate with peers to compute trust while being sure these peers are not defecting. If there is an answer
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 18:25:57
systems problems, but also the problem of incenting the participants in the network to behave properly. This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the system runs outside my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some was to ensure that /...\ deny service to other nodes in the network. You can't apply coersion to incent cooperation, you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very approximately, and you can't exactly send a computer to jail There is the distributed systems problems, but this is the easy /...\ Would it be possible to create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems which achive this within specific contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. Small scale groups do not use coersion, they
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 16:55:31
problem of incenting the participants in the network to >> behave properly. >> This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the >> system runs outside >> my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some /...\ nodes in the network. You can't apply >> coersion to incent cooperation, >> you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very >> approximately, >> and you can't exactly send a computer to jail >> >> There /...\ create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? >> >> I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems >> which achive this within specific >> contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. >> Small scale groups
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-03 11:04:25
participants in the network to >> >> behave properly. >> >> This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the >> >> system runs outside >> >> my own datacenter, on other people's computers then /...\ apply >> >> coersion to incent cooperation, >> >> you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very >> >> approximately, >> >> and you can't exactly send a computer to jail /...\ that enforced cooperation using just information? >> >> >> >> I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems >> >> which achive this within specific >> >> contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 23:05:21
problem of incenting the participants in the network to >> behave properly. >> This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the >> system runs outside >> my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some /...\ nodes in the network. You can't apply >> coersion to incent cooperation, >> you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very >> approximately, >> and you can't exactly send a computer to jail >> >> There /...\ create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? >> >> I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems >> which achive this within specific >> contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. >> Small scale groups
Richard D. Bartlett [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-03 11:08:18
systems problems, but also the problem of incenting the participants in the network to behave properly. This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the system runs outside my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some was to ensure that /...\ deny service to other nodes in the network. You can't apply coersion to incent cooperation, you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very approximately, and you can't exactly send a computer to jail There is the distributed systems problems, but this is the easy /...\ Would it be possible to create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems which achive this within specific contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. Small scale groups do not use coersion, they
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-02 14:44:40
systems problems, but also the problem of incenting the participants in the network to behave properly. This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the system runs outside my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some was to ensure that /...\ deny service to other nodes in the network. You can't apply coersion to incent cooperation, you probably don't know where the other computers are, except very approximately, and you can't exactly send a computer to jail There is the distributed systems problems, but this is the easy /...\ Would it be possible to create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems which achive this within specific contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. Small scale groups do not use coersion, they
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 15:31:53
technology businesses. On Apr 3, 2015, at 3:21 PM, Adam Ierymenko < adam.ierymenko@zerotier.com > wrote: I LOVE the term “grass computing!” This slide deck is from a talk I gave at a conference called border:none in Nuremberg, Germany last year: https://www.zerotier.com/misc/BorderNone2014-AdamIerymenko-DENY_ALL.pdf It goes into /...\ Internet has made it easy to access really big mainframes in “the cloud,” which is really just marketroid rebranding of mainframe computing. (All the tech, like containers and VMs, is old mainframe tech reimagined/rebooted.) Now we’re starting to see some efforts to push things back toward /...\ personal computing again, albeit with a different more networked model from the old grey box PC. There are aspects of the cloud that aren’t going away though. At central data centers it’s possible to achieve economies of scale that can make things like storage and compute
mempko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 18:11:20
technology businesses. On Apr 3, 2015, at 3:21 PM, Adam Ierymenko < adam.ierymenko @zerotier.com > wrote: I LOVE the term “grass computing!” This slide deck is from a talk I gave at a conference called border:none in Nuremberg, Germany last year: https://www.zerotier.com/misc/BorderNone2014-AdamIerymenko-DENY_ALL.pdf It goes /...\ Internet has made it easy to access really big mainframes in “the cloud,” which is really just marketroid rebranding of mainframe computing. (All the tech, like containers and VMs, is old mainframe tech reimagined/rebooted.) Now we’re starting to see some efforts to push things back toward /...\ personal computing again, albeit with a different more networked model from the old grey box PC. There are aspects of the cloud that aren’t going away though. At central data centers it’s possible to achieve economies of scale that can make things like storage and compute
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-13 21:04:47
Trust without some centralized "god" somewhere is extraordinarily hard for the reasons you discuss. How do I trust? How do I compute trust? How do I cooperate with peers to compute trust while being sure these peers are not defecting. > > I think the problem is trying /...\ compute trust algorithmically. In a completely decentralized network the information necessary to do that is not intrinsically available so you have to bootstrap trust in some other way. > > Everybody trusting some root authority is the easiest way to do that but it's also the most centralized /...\ determine their trust relationship with someone in New York? I guess you could traverse the graph, but now you are back to trying to compute trust. > So you *can* bootstrap trust (slowly) but you have to do it before the attack happens or suffer a large inefficiency
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 15:21:49
LOVE the term “grass computing!” This slide deck is from a talk I gave at a conference called border:none in Nuremberg, Germany last year: https://www.zerotier.com/misc/BorderNone2014-AdamIerymenko-DENY_ALL.pdf It goes into a bit of the history of how we got here and why everything’s become /...\ Internet has made it easy to access really big mainframes in “the cloud,” which is really just marketroid rebranding of mainframe computing. (All the tech, like containers and VMs, is old mainframe tech reimagined/rebooted.) Now we’re starting to see some efforts to push things back toward /...\ personal computing again, albeit with a different more networked model from the old grey box PC. There are aspects of the cloud that aren’t going away though. At central data centers it’s possible to achieve economies of scale that can make things like storage and compute
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-19 12:22:38
On Aug 14, 2014, at 1:30 AM, David Geib < trustiosity.zrm@gmail.com > wrote: It
Pierre Ozoux [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-04 00:38:32
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-14 04:30:54
determine their trust relationship with someone in New York? I guess you could traverse the graph, but now you are back to trying to compute trust But that's the whole problem, isn't it? If you have no direct contact and you have no trusted path you really have /...\ communication and digital storage might make it harder for people to behave dishonestly or inconsistently without getting caught. But then we're back to computing trust. And maybe that's not wrong. The real problem is trying to compute trust with no points of reference. Once you have some externally /...\ determined by processing power and solves the triangle by providing trust without centralization. An interesting question is what might we use instead of computing power to create a trust democracy that would allow the good guys to retain a majority. > This is basic to any relayed crypto peer
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-04 14:49:06
also the problem of incenting the participants in the network to > behave properly. > This is trivial if I own all the computers that run my system. But the > system runs outside > my own datacenter, on other people's computers then I need some /...\ possible to > create a system that enforced cooperation using just information? > > I think this is possible, not just because there are computer systems > which achive this within specific > contexts, but also, because humans can already do this naturally. I agree that using human society /...\ here. Feels as if I have missed something. Dominic, which system are you referring to here? > could you use crypto and computers to scale and secure a reputation > system, without giving any particular > node too much implicit trust? Yes. See above: I'd control whom I contract
ben [GG] Re: Public Money until tomorrow evening: 2016-04-10 14:54:00
Your occupation and expertise CEO of Cozy Cloud, a 18 people startup founded in 2012. I have a master of engineering in computer science in France (ENSIMAG) 1.2    What is your assessment of the current status of the Internet and its impact from /...\ this consultation the very last day of this survey...) is that decentralized ecosystems will emerge. Exactly as in 70's the rise of personal computers was impossible from the institutions point of view. IBM sold the MSDOS license to Bill Gate and in 1977 the CEO of DEC said /...\ will ever want a computer at home"... Today we are in the very same situation, the big guys seems more powerful than ever, but the decentralization will naturally emerge. At Cozy Cloud we are developing a personal cloud, a personal server that anyone can have, self-hosted or hosted
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-04 09:11:15
mempko" < mempko@gmail.com > wrote: Jer, Thanks! I am trying to fight the meme war and I think techno babbly phrases like Cloud Computing need a distributed counterpart :). I want people say "cloud computing? that's like soooo 2014". Max Jeremie Miller wrote: > Max, this is *great*, I love /...\ grass computing" :) > > Excellent blog post as well, I'm going to be re-sharing this link > often, thank you! > > Jer > > > On Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 8:01 PM, mempko < mempko@gmail.com > <mailto: mempko@gmail.com >> wrote
mempko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 10:06:29
Thanks! I am trying to fight the meme war and I think techno babbly phrases like Cloud Computing need a distributed counterpart :). I want people say "cloud computing? that's like soooo 2014". Max Jeremie Miller wrote: > Max, this is *great*, I love "grass computing
Robert Tischer [LibreList] RE: [redecentralize] Check out Hiveware's decentralized platform (as in no servers) 2015-09-02 13:49:55
special committee can ever encompass in their vision all the complexity of local situations. RT2>Actually, I'm a trained and practicing computer scientist as well and program 8 hours a day, so I in no way feel that technology is "coming from experts and dependent on them /...\ sell someone a digital item and repossess it if > some part of the payment fails? > Imagine the ability to sell someone a computer, and be able to remove contents from it that you deem inappropriate. That's exactly what Amazon did with books, what Apple does with /...\ what Lenovo does when it prevents me from changing the network card to one that I prefer, that is technically compatible with my computer, but didn't pass their commercial vendor agreement specifications (i.e., it doesn't have a backdoor built-in). Now, imagine if your car vendor would deem
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-05 00:48:45
where you take two inputs, encrypt them with a private key, hand them off to some other machine, have that machine perform a known computation *on the ciphertext*, and give you back the encrypted result, so you can decrypt it and get the answer. The machine that did the computation /...\ outputs -- it can only blindly operate on them. While some techniques (like RSA) were partially homomorphic, what you need to make arbitrary homomorphic computation is a system that can do both multiplication and addition (together, these are Turing complete), and no system to do this was found for 40 years
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-05 11:57:52
where you take two inputs, encrypt them with a private key, hand them off to some other machine, have that machine perform a known computation *on the ciphertext*, and give you back the encrypted result, so you can decrypt it and get the answer. The machine that did the computation /...\ outputs -- it can only blindly operate on them. While some techniques (like RSA) were partially homomorphic, what you need to make arbitrary homomorphic computation is a system that can do both multiplication and addition (together, these are Turing complete), and no system to do this was found for 40 years
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-12 20:23:47
Trust without some centralized "god" somewhere is extraordinarily hard for the reasons you discuss. How do I trust? How do I compute trust? How do I cooperate with peers to compute trust while being sure these peers are not defecting. I think the problem is trying to compute trust algorithmically
Christian de Larrinaga [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-04 12:26:02
mempko wrote: > Jer, > > Thanks! I am trying to fight the meme war and I think techno babbly > phrases like Cloud Computing need a distributed counterpart :). I want > people say "cloud computing? that's like soooo 2014". > > Max > > > Jeremie /...\ Miller wrote: >> Max, this is *great*, I love "grass computing" :) >> >> Excellent blog post as well, I'm going to be re-sharing this link >> often, thank
Christian de Larrinaga [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The next billion. A broken web. Social implications. 2015-09-17 18:26:32
difference between reductionism and this is that the former > assumes > > the world to be mechanical, and therefore entirely computable, > > measurable, controllable. The latter, while it's a lot more > > sophisticated, still assumes homomorphism between a partial model and > > reality. It works /...\ genealogy and diversity of situations and tend to remove from "the > > big picture" anything that "doesn't compute". > > > > A prime example is this belief that connecting everyone to the > Internet > > will bring more benefits than harm
Anish Mangal [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The next billion. A broken web. Social implications. 2015-09-17 22:29:01
holographic approach. > > The difference between reductionism and this is that the former assumes > the world to be mechanical, and therefore entirely computable, > measurable, controllable.  The latter, while it's a lot more > sophisticated, still assumes homomorphism between a partial model and > reality /...\ often fail to consider > the genealogy and diversity of situations and tend to remove from "the > big picture" anything that "doesn't compute". > > A prime example is this belief that connecting everyone to the Internet > will bring more benefits than harm
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Spring of User Experience 2014-02-28 10:00:04
offers a vastly superior user experience. I think a common and dangerous myth is that good UX is for "noobs" and "non-computer people." I've been programming since I was four and was a Linux user since 1992, but I love my Mac and I love really good user /...\ interfaces and zero-configuration apps. Why? Because I have better things to do than futz around with my computer to get it to work. I am way, way too busy for that. I *hate* things that make me climb a steep learning curve to do something trivial, or that require
Geoffroy Couprie [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Spring of User Experience 2014-02-28 19:33:08
offers a vastly superior user experience. I think a common and dangerous myth is that good UX is for "noobs" and "non-computer people." I've been programming since I was four and was a Linux user since 1992, but I love my Mac and I love really good user /...\ interfaces and zero-configuration apps. Why? Because I have better things to do than futz around with my computer to get it to work. I am way, way too busy for that. I *hate* things that make me climb a steep learning curve to do something trivial, or that require
hellekin [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Check out Hiveware's decentralized platform (as in no servers) 2015-09-02 13:06:32
sell someone a digital item and repossess > it if some part of the payment fails? > Imagine the ability to sell someone a computer, and be able to remove contents from it that you deem inappropriate. That's exactly what Amazon did with books, what Apple does with /...\ what Lenovo does when it prevents me from changing the network card to one that I prefer, that is technically compatible with my computer, but didn't pass their commercial vendor agreement specifications (i.e., it doesn't have a backdoor built-in). Now, imagine if your car vendor would deem
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Applying User-Agent Behaviors in Web Applications to Enable Runtime Extension 2014-03-10 14:51:13
code?) might be for you. Where is the users data kept in the case of mint.com? At (one or more of) the users computer(s) or at mint.com's machines? > I'm having trouble loading some of Askemos' docs, Please send details to me off-list. I'll shall /...\ That is we actually test that we can run it from cheap peers behind consumer grade ADSL lines at home. Most nodes are plug computers, some are behind apache-vhosts we don't control directly. At least those tonido-plugs have a bug which requires them to be rebooted
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Applying User-Agent Behaviors in Web Applications to Enable Runtime Extension 2014-03-10 11:51:10
might be for you. Where is the users data kept in the case of mint.com ?  At (one or more of) the users computer(s) or at mint.com 's machines? > I'm having trouble loading some of Askemos' docs, Please send details to me off-list /...\ actually test that we can run it from cheap peers behind consumer grade ADSL lines at home.  Most nodes are plug computers, some are behind apache-vhosts we don't control directly.  At least those tonido-plugs have a bug which requires them to be rebooted
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] First Person Technologies 2014-03-30 15:00:08
networked world, however, it is not — and this is a problem that needs fixing. For example, there was a time when personal computers were truly personal. They ran applications that you acquired (or created) and used by and for yourself. You did not have to subscribe to them /...\ services, and they did not require some company’s cloud. That time was before person al computers became network nodes. We are in a new world now — one in which first person agency is both provided and limited by what the lawyers call second and third parties
Ximin Luo [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] First Person Technologies 2014-03-31 19:36:04
Anish Mangal [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The next billion. A broken web. Social implications. 2015-09-17 21:02:50
call this the holographic approach. The difference between reductionism and this is that the former assumes the world to be mechanical, and therefore entirely computable, measurable, controllable.  The latter, while it's a lot more sophisticated, still assumes homomorphism between a partial model and reality /...\ They often fail to consider the genealogy and diversity of situations and tend to remove from "the big picture" anything that "doesn't compute". A prime example is this belief that connecting everyone to the Internet will bring more benefits than harm.  But so far, there
P S [LibreList] First Person Technologies 2014-03-29 17:32:15
networked world, however, it is not — and this is a problem that needs fixing. For example, there was a time when personal computers were truly personal. They ran applications that you acquired (or created) and used by and for yourself. You did not have to subscribe to them /...\ services, and they did not require some company’s cloud. That time was before personal computers became network nodes. We are in a new world now — one in which first person agency is both provided and limited by what the lawyers call second and third parties
Christian de Larrinaga [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The next billion. A broken web. Social implications. 2015-09-17 17:36:01
holographic approach. > > The difference between reductionism and this is that the former assumes > the world to be mechanical, and therefore entirely computable, > measurable, controllable. The latter, while it's a lot more > sophisticated, still assumes homomorphism between a partial model and > reality. It works /...\ consider > the genealogy and diversity of situations and tend to remove from "the > big picture" anything that "doesn't compute". > > A prime example is this belief that connecting everyone to the Internet > will bring more benefits than harm
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-03 10:45:39
malicious.) Instead: link the value to some script, which is invoked as the "storing" (better now "maintaining") node to compute the update upon request. (Take the script as some kind of "contract" governing the update rules. No peer simply accepts updates, the check /...\ handling of keys, expiration time etc. would suddenly be user defined. > In Turing-completeness there are shockingly minimal systems that are universal computers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_instruction_set_computer I'm afraid there needs to be some compromise. That's too simple to be usable. How about allowing some kind of hashbang
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Re: Trustworthy Contract Handling - Comparison Of Approaches 2014-08-07 11:31:57
need "trust but verify": since we must not allow any single human to control the agent, we can not allow a single computer to compute the update and then somehow copy the new state to other peers. After all the origin peer might be a traitor. We need
Nicholas H.Tollervey [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Re: Trustworthy Contract Handling - Comparison Of Approaches 2014-08-15 17:46:37
trust but verify": since we must not allow any single > human to control the agent, we can not allow a single computer to > compute the update and then somehow copy the new state to other > peers. After all the origin peer might be a traitor
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-21 11:23:12
Human societies are networks too. I think this work has po litical and philosophical implications inasmuch as the same information theoretic principles that govern computer networks might also operate in human ones. If we can fix it here, maybe it can help us find new ways of fixing it there /...\ least in law. (Let alone custom!)  Which we might want to fix. The useful isomorphism is pretty obvious.  At least to computer scientists, lawyers and ethics professionals as it turned out during the project.  And the rigor it enforces upon the programmer, when she is must treat
Stephan Tual [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-22 14:41:22
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-22 13:51:28
I don’t think there’s anything wrong with
Stephan Tual [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-24 22:15:06
hellekin [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The next billion. A broken web. Social implications. 2015-09-17 11:17:34
call this the holographic approach. The difference between reductionism and this is that the former assumes the world to be mechanical, and therefore entirely computable, measurable, controllable. The latter, while it's a lot more sophisticated, still assumes homomorphism between a partial model and reality. It works for specific, limited /...\ fail to consider the genealogy and diversity of situations and tend to remove from "the big picture" anything that "doesn't compute". A prime example is this belief that connecting everyone to the Internet will bring more benefits than harm. But so far, there
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Types of decentralization 2014-01-14 10:25:17
functionally or physically decentralized. (2) A flat IP network (one with no NAT or discriminating inline firewalls) would present a functionally decentralized system. Any computer on this network can contact any other. This would be true even if they were all attached to the same ISP or if the network
ken Code [LibreList] ken Code - #ePlug (Meshnet, Distributed Computing, Decentralized IoT) 2015-01-19 20:54:26
Code  COO, http://kenCode.de   Crypto + IoT + Distrib Computing + Meshnet: #ePlug  #kenCode +kenCode @kenCode_de  München, Deutschland  </sig
Paul Frazee [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Spring of User Experience 2014-02-28 17:53:18
attack arguments. They also made a big deal out of the fact that some of their team have PhDs. They weren't in computer security, though. I do not want to present this as a "you must listen to a security professional" advice. The security community is realising more
Benjamin ANDRE [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-10 11:40:51
also end up using a lot of plain text files and emailing myself notes when I'm not in front of a proper computer. Anyone know of better solutions? Danny On 12/09/2013 08:22 AM, Francis Irving wrote: Whats the list of services you're using instead of Google ones
Ximin Luo [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Spring of User Experience 2014-02-28 22:46:58
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-19 12:52:55
orders of magnitude less to run. You don’t need data centers that consume hundreds of megawatts of power to handle every single computation and store every single bit of data. So your opportunities to monetize are lower but your costs are also lower. Do those factors balance
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-20 00:56:27
Human societies are networks too. I think this work has po litical and philosophical implications inasmuch as the same information theoretic principles that govern computer networks might also operate in human ones. > If we can fix it here, maybe it can help us find new ways of fixing
Danny Knestaut [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-09 14:15:09
also end up using a lot of plain text files and emailing myself notes when I'm not in front of a proper computer. Anyone know of better solutions? Danny On 12/09/2013 08:22 AM, Francis Irving wrote: Whats the list of services you're using instead of Google ones
David Burns [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-20 12:49:31
Human societies are networks too. I think this work has po litical and philosophical implications inasmuch as the same information theoretic principles that govern computer networks might also operate in human ones. If we can fix it here, maybe it can help us find new ways of fixing it there
Francis Irving [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-10 01:52:00
also end up using a lot of plain text files and > emailing myself notes when I'm not in front of a proper computer. > > Anyone know of better solutions? > > Danny > > On 12/09/2013 08:22 AM, Francis Irving wrote: > > > >Whats
Pierre Ozoux [GG] Re: WebTorrent Desktop - open source streaming torrent client 2016-04-07 04:06:00
Amazing! Thanks a lot :) (Started to download/seed the Introduction to computer programming) Pierre
hellekin [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] connecting 2015-09-16 16:15:21
onnect/ > They use Pagekite. They could use Tor. Tor is very nice for this. I use it to connect to my parents' computer from anywhere. No need to deal with dynamic DNS or stupid ADSL IP address changes. It just works. > > And all this is also connected
Jos Poortvliet [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] connecting 2015-09-17 08:09:46
They could use Tor.  Tor is very nice for this.  I > use it to connect to my parents' computer from anywhere.  No need to > deal with dynamic DNS or stupid ADSL IP address changes.  It just works. Oh, that
David Geib [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-08-29 19:55:53
Adam Ierymenko < adam.ierymenko@zerotier.com > wrote: Heh. I should clarify that: you have to do it from your own computer. That’s the point. I tested with an app called Newsfire, but it can be any local RSS reader, web browser, or URL fetcher. The point
Eric Mill [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-08-31 21:36:34
Adam Ierymenko < adam.ierymenko@zerotier.com > wrote: Heh. I should clarify that: you have to do it from your own computer. That’s the point. I tested with an app called Newsfire, but it can be any local RSS reader, web browser, or URL fetcher. The point
Robert Tischer [LibreList] RE: [redecentralize] Check out Hiveware's decentralized platform (as in no servers) 2015-09-02 11:05:11
make much sense if you can guarantee un-eaves-droppable end-to-end delivery. Servers can go back to being a commodity that delivers computing power and ease of setup/maintenance to end users. Meta (Big) Data analysis of A->S->B data transport is another discussion which would
Nicholas H.Tollervey [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Yesterday's London meet-up 2014-01-15 14:37:29
last year's Europython Holger Krekel (cc'd) gave a keynote > titled "The return of peer-to-peer computing" > (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCgl0xXFVOg) which is well worth > a watch. Buddies at the conference tweeted at me during his talk > telling me I should
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-08-29 15:17:09
should clarify that: you have to do it from your own computer. That’s the point. I tested with an app called Newsfire, but it can be any local RSS reader, web browser, or URL fetcher. The point is to make a trivial and goofy but hopefully
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hosting services in the browser 2014-06-06 08:46:27
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Lessig#.22Code_is_law.22 Code as social control. If you are in the boat of seeing similarities between code as in law and code as in computer programs, you might enjoy how this equivalence became the heart of a software architecture: http://askemos.org/index.html?_v=footnote&_id=1223 Goes all the way down to start from
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Decentralization and antifragility 2014-01-14 09:51:11
concept of antifragility in general, so I've forwarded it around simply for that purpose to a few folks who aren't into computer networking. :) On Jan 14, 2014, at 3:57 AM, JC Brand <lists@opkode.com> wrote: > Hi everyone > > This is my first post
Jeremie Miller [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Yesterday's London meet-up 2014-01-08 06:03:22
last year's Europython Holger Krekel (cc'd) gave a keynote titled > "The return of peer-to-peer computing" > (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCgl0xXFVOg) which is well worth a > watch. Buddies at the conference tweeted at me during his talk telling > me I should
Nicholas H.Tollervey [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Yesterday's London meet-up 2014-01-08 10:49:44
elucidate? > Yes. At last year's Europython Holger Krekel (cc'd) gave a keynote titled "The return of peer-to-peer computing" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCgl0xXFVOg) which is well worth a watch. Buddies at the conference tweeted at me during his talk telling me I should
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-04 15:07:09
structures as well, This would be the easy part. We just create the data structures at all commissioned peers simultaneously. This requires a small computational overhead, but still way cheaper than proof-of-work or some such. > or we rely on central nodes to keep data-bases
Dominic Tarr [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-05 06:51:59
jorg, The short answer is no; secure-scuttlebutt is eventually consistent so you cannot easily enforce invariants like that. On the other hand, computers are fundamentally eventually consistent because of the finite speed of light. So, you are always building layers of consistency on top of eventually consistent layers
Jörg F. Wittenberger [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization and deperimeterization 2014-09-06 08:34:56
short answer is no; secure-scuttlebutt is eventually consistent so > you cannot easily enforce invariants like that. > > On the other hand, computers are fundamentally eventually consistent > because of the finite speed of light. > So, you are always building layers of consistency on top of eventually
Benjamin ANDRE [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-10 17:36:48
also end up using a lot of plain text files and emailing myself notes when I'm not in front of a proper computer. Anyone know of better solutions? Danny On 12/09/2013 08:22 AM, Francis Irving wrote: Whats the list of services you're using instead of Google ones
Danny Knestaut [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-10 10:16:04
also end up using a lot of plain text files and emailing myself notes when I'm not in front of a proper computer. Anyone know of better solutions? Danny On 12/09/2013 08:22 AM, Francis Irving wrote: Whats the list of services you're using instead of Google ones
Brian Cloutier [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 05:32:00
mempko < mempko@gmail.com > wrote: Hi All, I thought you guys/gals would like this post I made. https://mempko.wordpress.com/ 2015/04/02/the-shadow-of-the- cloud-on-grass-computing/ Let me know what you think and any corrections I can make. I personally enjoy both the technical and the social/political issues of decentralized software
Jeremie Miller [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] The Cloud's Shadow on Grass Computing 2015-04-03 07:06:39
this is *great*, I love "grass computing" :) Excellent blog post as well, I'm going to be re-sharing this link often, thank you! Jer On Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 8:01 PM, mempko < mempko@gmail.com > wrote: Hi All, I thought you guys/gals would like this post
David Burns [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Europython talk on P2P & Politics 2014-07-26 12:18:20
talk about politics and peer-to-peer at this week's EuroPython conference in Berlin. The Return of "The Return of Peer to Peer Computing". As always, comments, suggestions and critique most welcome! All the best, Nicholas. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.12 (GNU/Linux) Comment: Using GnuPG with Thunderbird
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-02 12:47:06
year. That's it. Or could we go even more minimal than that? In Turing-completeness there are shockingly minimal systems that are universal computers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_instruction_set_computer
Jan Kunkel [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-11 22:18:27
Adam Ierymenko [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Thoughts on decentralization: "I want to believe." 2014-08-04 16:04:39
protocol I know about, every DHT, etc. from consideration for mobile. >> In Turing-completeness there are shockingly minimal systems that are universal computers: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_instruction_set_computer > > I'm afraid there needs to be some compromise. That's too simple to be > usable. How about allowing
Lockwood Michael [LibreList] Conference Tickets 2015-10-07 14:21:15
anybody know if there will be any more ? Best Mick Mick Lockwood Lecturer In Digital Design | School of Art and Design Programme Leader | BSc Computer And Video Games HT105, Centenary Building, University of Salford, Salford M3 6EQ t: +44 (0) 161 295 4879 m.g.lockwood@salford.ac.uk | www.salford.ac.uk/art-design
Steve Phillips [LibreList] Re: Sync/backup session was Re: [redecentralize] RDC 15 2015-10-15 14:07:49
build one from source and side-load it, but I haven't gotten around to it). I have it installed on a 32-bit computer I'm about to wipe and replace with a 64-bit one. I won't let someone else host my data unless
Jan Kunkel [LibreList] Re: [redecentralize] Hello! 2013-12-10 15:34:56
using a lot of plain text files and emailing myself >> notes >> when I'm not in front of a proper computer. >> >> Anyone know of better solutions? >> >> Danny >> >> >> On 12/09/2013
Goffi [LibreList] Hello + Salut à Toi / Libervia 2015-08-22 18:15:14
only OTR for instant messaging so far), and is multi-interfaces (web, desktop, command line, console). We have many planed projects like a micro-computer pre-installed (based on a Olinuxino Lime2), a Tor version, and integration in other software. The project is already available in Debian, Arch Linux